Grandfather clocks

Grandfather Clock Sale Attention Service

06.17.14

Finding a grandfather clocks sale is easy.  Look just about anywhere online, and you will have the words discount, for sale, for less, sale ending soon, free gift, lowest price, most savings, and on and on and on.

So what is the 1-800-4CLOCKS difference?  At well over 90% of the places that list grandfather clocks for sale, one will find they cannot find anyone to answer any specific important questions, like the difference between Howard Miller Grandfather Clocks, Kieninger grandfather clocks, and Ridgeway and Hermle Grandfather Clocks.  What about differences not only between grandfather clock brands, but the different models made by those same makers.  And staring at a consumer everywhere will be much less expensive clocks that may look nearly identical to others.  Are they both heirloom quality grandfather clocks?  Will the chimes quality be the same from brand to brand?  Will the clocks last several generations, or simply be lucky to make the trip home and hopefully get it running.  What about questions like the difference between grandmother clocks and grandfather clocks? How much does the movement maker matter?  Should you consider buying a quartz or battery operated grandfather clock.  What is the difference between a single chime Westminster Chime grandfather clock, a triple chime grandfather clock, and what on earth is a tubular chime grandfather clock, and should I ever consider one?  What about new vs used vs antique grandfather clocks and floor clocks.  And these questions would likely be just the beginning for a thoughtful grandfather clock shopper who is trying to get a sense of the market and pros and cons of grandfather clock choices.

So you have found someone who is willing to talk with you, and knows something about grandfather clocks.  But how much?  Unless you happen on someone who is both expert and available, one could be spinning his or her wheels for a very long time. This is where the 1-800-4CLOCKS difference comes in to play.  We know all the makers, from the current high-end grandfather clock brands built to last to the “junk brands” built to get you out the door with their merchandise (and frequently not even any instruction booklet).  We know the differences between brands and within brands.  Our salespeople do not work on commission, so they are always looking to give you the best advice to get and hopefully keep you as a long-term customer who is informed about the market.  There is a lot out there that an informed person would want to avoid, and in some cases minimally go in with eyes wide open.  This is particularly true with vintage grandfather clocks, where the risk of buying a cash eating machine is all too real.

Our stores were founded by people who have a passion for clocks and watches, and we look for that in everyone who comes to work with us.  Our roots are actually in antique clocks, so we know grandfather clock history, the movement maker history, not only who the current players are but also who the historical players were, and the implications that has for chiming mechanical floor clocks made today.  This is also true for mantel clocks and wall clocks.

We know the Howard Miller and Herman Miller of today, and we also know the Howard Miller Clocks from 90 years ago.  We know Hermle Grandfather Clocks from almost 100 years ago.  We know Ridgeway grandfather clocks and grandmother clocks, not to mention Kieninger grandfather clocks, from 50 to 100 years ago.  We also know about Sligh grandfather clocks, the famous Seth Thomas regulators and grandfather clocks and wall clocks and mantel clocks, and Bulova and Americana grandfather clocks.  Plus throw in Tiffany Grandfather Clocks made over many years, all the features added over time, including illuminated dials and automatic nighttime shutoff, the changes in features like tubular chimes, and we have a virtual treasure trove of information to share the relevant tidbits to match the needs of our customers.  Additionally, we are always willing to work with a customer as best we can to match their needs and desires with realistic budgets within which they are working.

We aim to surprise and delight our customers every single day with exception service and attention to detail.  And with all that, not only will we work hard to give you best value for grandfather clocks money spent, but also still the best grandfather clock sale price available anywhere.

Grandfather Clock Service Award

 

 

 

 

 

Hermle Clocks History

12.30.13

Hermle Clocks North America

Welcome to Hermle Clocks’ History.  Hermle Clock builds beautiful clocks of all kinds, including grandfather clocks, floor clocks, anniversary clocks, grandmother clocks, wall clocks, mantle clocks, cuckoo clocks and specialty clocks including Telleriums and Astrolabiums.  Mechanical chime playing clock movements, as well as quartz operated movements, are one key specialty.

In 1977, Hermle Black Forest Clocks located in the scenic foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains manufactured and shipped its first
Hermle mechanical movement on US soil.  It was the beginning of how the modern era of the clock industry was going to proceed.  Hermle supplied many of the existing clock case goods manufacturers with its sought after German quality mechanisms. Many of Hermle Clocks customers received training of our expertise in the assembly of their case goods.  Naturally, in the early 1980′s, Hermle Clocks was asked to assemble our movements into our customers cases which then became a staple of our production line.

In 2002, we opened our doors to the clock retail industry with Hermle branded clocks, including Hermle grandfather clocks, being assembled in our factory in Amherst, Virginia, and a selection of German made Hermle clocks.  After 6 expansions to our factory, Hermle continued our growth as not only the world’s leader in clock mechanisms, but as an alternative grandfather clock, wall clock and mantel clock source to the retailers of North America.

Our innovations in design, form and function keep Hermle Clock ahead of the curve and its meticulous quality improvements have made
Hermle North America a preferred clock source to the industry. Hermle Black Forest Clocks was rebranded as Hermle North America in January 2011 to signify the next step into the future.  Hermle North America will become a one-stop shop for all genuine Hermle products, including carrying the largest Hermle and Urgos movement selection available to the trade in the world.  Our clock movements, clock accessories, clock parts and clocks are distributed throughout North America to a vast dealer network. To find Hermle Clocks in North America, please contact 1-800-4CLOCKS.com (1-800-425-6257, ext. 1).

The Hermle Clock History

In 1922 Hermle Clocks founder Mr. Franz Hermle founded the Franz Hermle Clock Company located in Gosheim in Baden Wuerttemberg, a small town in southern Germany’s Black Forest region.

Within ten years Hermle Clocks became known as one of the most efficient manufacturers of clock movements in the clock industry.  Even though the first half of the 20th Century brought with it many difficulties to overcome, including the complete dismantling of the factory after the World War II, Franz Hermle and his sons” dedication allowed them to prosper while other companies struggled.

Franz Hermle passed away in 1953 and left a modern and prosperous operation to his sons Gebhard, Alfred, Hans and Heinrich Hermle.  With tremendous willpower and energy, they continued to build the company into the worldwide leader in manufacturing mechanical movements and clocks.

In 1977, Hermle decided to establish another manufacturing facility, Hermle Black Forest Clock Company to serve the North American market out of Amherst, Virginia, USA.  Hermle’s Headquarters in southern Germany is now in its third generation, still family owned and operated.  Hermle employs over 200 people in 3 locations in both Germany and USA.  In October 2010, Hermle Gosheim was
rebranded as Hermle Uhrenmanufacktur GmbH and as of January 2011, Hermle Black Forest Clocks rebranded itself as Hermle North America.

Franz Hermle Clocks in Gosheim in Baden Wuerttemberg Germany

Wall Clocks and Mantel Clocks FAQs

12.10.13

To be helpful for grandfather clock and wall clock and mantel clock users and shoppers all across the globe. we are posting here some of the more Frequently Asked Questions for Mantle Clocks and Wall Clocks.  These lists were compiled by the technical support team at Howard Miller Clocks, and may apply to many other high-end wall clock and mantel clock brands as well.

For Keywound Mantel Clocks and Keywound Wall Clocks:

Following is a list of Frequently Asked Questions related to “Keywound” “Wall/Mantel Clocks”

 

What if my mechanical clock will not chime or strike?
  1. Check that the strike on/off lever in not in the “strike off” position or halfway between positions.
  2. Check that the movement is not in the “night off” position.
  3. Be sure that all the packing material is removed from the movement area. You should be able to carefully pull each hammer back away from the rod approximately one inch.
  4. Check the hammer adjustment to be sure that the hammers are properly aligned with the gong rods.
  5. For weight driven clocks, make certain that the weights are in their proper location. The proper position of the weights as you are facing your clock is labeled on the bottom of each weight.
  6. If your clock is a cable driven clock and was previously run, it is possible that the cables were not wound up with the weights left on the pulley. When this happens, the cables overlap on the drum. Check the cables on the drums to see if they are overlapped. If so, contact the dealer or retailer where you purchased the clock. Correcting this problem is not covered under warranty.
What if I need a part?
  1. If your purchase is new, is missing a part, and was not in the original carton, contact the location where you purchased the item. This will be the quickest and easiest way to obtain parts that they likely have, but failed to provide.
  2. If your clock is new, is missing a part, and was in the original carton, carefully check the packing material. At Howard Miller we take great care to include all parts with every item. If your are confident that the item is missing, contact Customer Service at (616)-772-7277 or go to the QUESTION section at the bottom of this site and detail the part that you need. Have your model number, serial number, and sales receipt available before you place the call.
  3. If your clock is not new or if a part is damaged and parts are required, contact Customer Service at (616)-772-7277 or go to the QUESTION section at the bottom of this site and detail the part that you need. Have your model number, serial number, and credit card available before you place the call.
What if I hear a squeaking sound while winding my movement?
The squeak is likely from the wood knob on the winding crank.  This is not uncommon and does not indicate anything is wrong with the movement or crank.  The movements themselves will not squeak when they are wound.

If you turn the crank by hand without using the knob, and you still hearing squeaking, then it is the pulley that is squeaking.  You can place one drop of oil (any type of common oil)  on both sides of the pulley wheel where the shaft goes through.

Why is it necessary to have my clock movement cleaned?

Movement oil collects dust and other contaminants from the air. These contaminants can be abrasive and the oil can harden. For this reason, it is necessary to have the movement cleaned and oiled. The frequency of cleaning and oiling depends upon several factors, some of which include the humidity and temperature controls and cleanliness of the environment. Based on these factors, oiling should be performed every 2 to 5 years and thorough cleaning every 5 to 10 years.

What are the symptoms that the clock movement should be oiled and/or cleaned?

Signs that a movement could require oiling or cleaning can include slowing or erratic operation of the time keeping, chiming melody, and/or hour strike. Continued use may cause excessive wear and require more extensive service to the movement.

What if I want to clean and oil my own clock movement?

Howard Miller does not recommend that you service the clock movement yourself. Contact an authorized Howard Miller Service Center. However, if you feel inclined, there are a variety of internet sites that offer detailed instructions and kits necessary to perform your own cleaning and oiling. Search “clock oil kit”, for example, on the internet.

What clock oil is recommended by Howard Miller?
Howard Miller recommends using the same high quality synthetic clock oil 859 used by the original German movement manufacturer, Kieninger. Most clock oil kits available on the web contain less expensive oils (Nano oil and others). Contrary to claims made by Nano oil and other suppliers and manufacturers of oil, our testing has proven the advantages of synthetic clock oil 859. For convenience, Howard Miller offers a synthetic 859 pen oiler for sale on the Howard Miller web site on the tab entitled, “Need a Part. Purchase Parts & Accessories Online.”
What if my clock chimes a few minutes before or after the hour?
If the clock chimes more than one minute before or after the proper time, the minute hand should be removed and adjusted.  For complete details, please refer to page 10 of the Floor Clock Instruction Manual or page 3 in the Wall and Mantel Clock Instruction Manual.  Copies of these manuals can be down loaded from our web site for your convenience.

Please click the link below to watch the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-99j6QSCoI&feature=plcp

How do I reset the time for daylight savings?
When setting the clock back one hour, rotate the minute hand counterclockwise one-hour. When setting the clock ahead one hour, rotate the minute hand clockwise one-hour. When moving the hands forward, it is important to allow the clock to chime every quarter hour (1/4, ½, ¾, 1) before advancing the hands to the next quarter hour position. . DO NOT MOVE THE HANDS WHILE THE CLOCK IS CHIMING OR STRIKING.

Please click the link below to watch the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_EGbI3SMsA&feature=plcp

Where is the closest Authorized Service Center in my area?
A list of Service Centers in your area is available on this web site.
What if my mechanical clock does not strike the correct hour?
If the clock is new, allow it to operate for several hours before making any adjustments. If the strike is off, grasp the HOUR HAND ONLY and rotate it forward or backward to line up with the correct hour on the dial indicated by the number of times the hour strikes. Rotating this hand independently will not harm the movement. Then adjust the hands to the correct time by rotating the minute hand counter-clockwise – as explained in the instructions. DO NOT MOVE THE HANDS WHILE THE CLOCK IS CHIMING OR STRIKING. After a few hours, the movement’s self-adjusting feature will synchronize the hands with the correct chime and strike.

Please click the link below to watch the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgaqpWTwIes&feature=plcp

What if my mechanical clock is in the “night off” position and it is silent during the day instead of the night?
Rotate the minute hand counterclockwise twelve hours. DO NOT MOVE THE HANDS WHILE THE CLOCK IS CHIMING OR STRIKING.
What if my clock chimes have the incorrect tone?
The chime tone may be affected by the hammer resting on the chime rod (coil) or striking the rod (coil) off center. Although the hammers were set at the factory, it is possible for the hammers to get out of adjustment.
Chime hammer arms are made of brass and can be bent safely. This is accomplished by bending the hammer arms slightly in the middle so that the hammers rest approximately 1/8 inch from the chime rod. DO NOT bend the chime rod. Strike volume cannot be adjusted.Please click the link below to watch the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmh1ao32JBo&feature=plcp

Can I increase or decrease the chime volume in my mechanical clock?
No. Volume is not adjustable.
What if a chime rod is broken?
Contact a local service center or Howard Miller for a replacement rod.
What if my mechanical clock operated fine for several years but now is slow or stopping?
It is likely that your clock movement needs maintenance. Contact an authorized  Service Center.  A list of Service Centers is located on this web site.  Cleaning and oiling are not covered under warranty.
What if the hands are bent?
The clock hands are easily bent. Carefully bend them back to the correct position.
How do I wind my clock?
Floor Clocks with Cables and Pulleys – Weights that are suspended by cables with pulleys should be raised by using the crank provided. DO NOT lift the weights by hand while cranking. Insert the crank into the holes located in the dial face. It does not matter in what order the clock weights wound. All weights need to be wound to the up position.

Floor Clocks with Chains – Pull straight down on the chains. DO NOT lift up on the weights as this could cause the weight to come unhooked from the chain. Pull down on the loose end of the chain until the weight is approximately 2 inches from the bottom of the wood movement mounting board. It does not matter in what order the clock weights wound. All weights need to be wound to the up position.

Wall and Mantel Clocks – Insert the winding key into the holes located in the dial face. Depending upon the model of your clock, there can be 1, 2, or 3 winding keyholes. Turn the key clockwise until the spring becomes tight and will not turn further. For clocks with hanging weights, raise the weights using the crank. DO NOT lift the weights by hand while cranking. Wind your clock once a week. It does not matter in what order the clock weights wound. All springs must be fully wound.

What is meant by “triple chime”?
Triple chime refers to clocks that play a choice of three different melodies. The most common triple chime melodies are Westminster, St. Michaels, and Whittington.
Why is it necessary to have my clock movement oiled?
 

In mechanical devices with moving components, oil acts as a lubricant to help prevent friction and wear. Over time, the oil must be replenished. The frequency of oiling depends upon several factors, some of which include humidity and temperature controls and cleanliness of the environment. Based on these factors, oiling should be performed every 2 to 5 years.

Who should I contact to have my clock cleaned and oiled?
Contact an authorized Service Center.  A service center locator is available at this internet site. Cleaning and oiling are not covered under warranty.
What if my clock is out of warranty and needs service?
Contact an Authorized Service Center. A list of Service Centers is available under CUSTOMER SUPPORT.

For Quartz or Battery Operated Wall Clocks and Mantle Clocks

Where is the closest Authorized Service Center in my area?
A list of Service Centers in your area is available on this web site.
What if my clock is out of warranty and needs service?
Contact an Authorized Service Center. A list of Service Centers is available under CUSTOMER SUPPORT.
What if my quartz dual chime movement will not operate properly?
Before going further, follow the two instructions below.

  1. First, ensure that you are using brand new alkaline batteries.
  2. Batteries made by various manufacturers may present some difficulty in working properly in the movement. A poor electrical connection can cause inferior performance. Ensure that the positive battery contacts are positioned over the nub on the end of the battery.

The problem area is typically the negative end of the battery. Ensure that the negative battery contacts are positioned completely on the metal contact area of the battery. As necessary, bend the battery contacts out to ensure that they are not making contact with the battery casing. If necessary to ensure a proper contact on the negative end of the battery, take a 1 inch by 1 inch piece of aluminum foil and fold it over tightly to the size of ¼ inch by ¼ inch and place it between the battery contact and the battery.

Other issues and remedies.

Pendulum will not swing: To provide proper pendulum operation, it is also necessary to ensure that the clock is level. Also check that the pendulum is properly located on the pendulum hanger and that the speaker wires are not interfering with the pendulum operation.

Chime volume is off or lower during the day and louder at other times: The nighttime volume reduction or shut-off is not properly set. Reset the nighttime shut-off.

Chime volume is always low: Attempt to increase volume using the volume control knob. If this does not solve the problem, replace the batteries.

Chime is off – will not chime: Ensure that the chime is not in the “OFF” position. If this does not solve the problem, replace the batteries.

The clock chimes several minutes before the hour when the hands are moved manually: This is normal. The clock will chime on the hour under normal operation.

What if I need a part?
  1. If your purchase is new, is missing a part, and was not in the original carton, contact the location where you purchased the item. This will be the quickest and easiest way to obtain parts that they likely have, but failed to provide.
  2. If your clock is new, is missing a part, and was in the original carton, carefully check the packing material. At Howard Miller we take great care to include all parts with every item. If your are confident that the item is missing, contact Customer Service at (616)-772-7277 or go to the QUESTION section at the bottom of this site and detail the part that you need. Have your model number, serial number, and sales receipt available before you place the call.
  3. If your clock is not new or if a part is damaged and parts are required, contact Customer Service at (616)-772-7277 or go to the QUESTION section at the bottom of this site and detail the part that you need. Have your model number, serial number, and credit card available before you place the call.

© Howard Miller Clocks

Grandfather Clocks History Past-Present

10.07.13

Some grandfather clock history and clocks history never gets old.  Just look at the stories of Simon Willard, Aaron Willard and Benjamin Willard.  An article written in 1936 is still as informative and interesting to a clocks historian as one written today.  Grandfather Clocks enthusiasts are sure to minimally find this interesting.

Richmond Times-Dispatch
May 24, 1936

Grandfather Clocks, Some Genuine Old-Timers Still Tick Off Hours or Chime Timely Melodies, Proof of Care Their Makers Used

Many things had been discussed by the little group seated behind the plate glass window of a Franklin Street store. And that isn’t exactly true either. Many things had been broached, but the discussion was almost wholly a monologue by the host, a veteran of many a trek into the hinterlands of the antique country and a recognized authority on early American antiques. Now and then a listening member would throw a few words into the conversation, more to keep the oratory flowing than for any factual use, until at last someone uttered those well-worn last words: “What time is it getting to be?”

Subconsciously glances were directed toward the tall dominating grandfather clock against the far wall. Then they fell back to modern wrist-watches and there was a concerted start–for watch and clock pointed to the same hour. No one mentioned it, but there was a subtle sort of mental agreement that it was all “just a coincidence.” But it wasn’t. That old grandfather’s clock was still keeping time, and correct time. “How come?” I lingered to question the antique dealer. And thereby came this tale, a story of famous old American clocks and clockmakers.  It seems that– when Simon Willard was 13 years old he made his first “grandfather” clock. When he was 82 he made the large clock in the Capitol at Washington. He was born in 1753, lived to be 95 years old, and left behind him some of the best and most beautiful clocks that have ever been made.

Simon Willard had no grand ideas about organization, sales promotion and production. He did all his work in the space of four rooms. It is good to think that Simon’s clocks, which were made by hand and with infinite care and solicitude, command a higher price today than those made by Aaron Willard, his brother, who opened up a factory and turned out watches and clocks by the hundreds.

Side by side in a Richmond, Virginia antique shop may be seen a grandfather clock made by Simon Willard and one by Aaron Willard. To the connoisseur with blood in his eye the clock made by Simon is much the finer. To the casual onlooker both the clocks are rare examples of early American grandfather (or long case) clocks.

A Simon Willard “Grandfather” clock (left), which is still in first-class condition. The case is very handsome with its curved fretwork on top. Phases of the moon and the days of the month are both given. Simon Willard made his first Grandfather clock at the age of 13.
A Simon Willard shelf clock (right). The Willards’ called these clocks, which were made as early as 1784, timepieces, because they did not strike. The works are made of brass.

 

Benjamin Willard, who started making clocks in 1764, was the father of Aaron and Simon, and the first of this famous Massachusetts family to engage in clock-making. In the Boston Gazette for February 22, 1771, he advertised, “Musical clocks playing different tunes, a new tune every day in the week, and on Sunday a Psalm tune. These tunes perform every hour.”

Reliable Clocks Kept Puritan Sabbath

And such is the reliability of a Willard clock that there is no single record of a Puritan Sabbath being violated by week-day tunes. Likewise, the beauty and workmanship which went into the clock cases of Simon Willard is not the only reason these clocks bring good prices wherever antiques are sold: The clocks run and they keep good time.

Simon Willard was an inventor of genius, but that did not keep him from being a thrifty American. He thought that clocks ought to be good and that they ought to be cheap enough for an American to own one, and at the same time have money enough left for a house to put it in. He advertised little, relying on his clock papers (and his clocks) to put across his ideas. One of these clock papers tells his story:

A Simon Willard ‘Grandfather’ clock (left), which is still in first-class condition. The case very handsome with its curved fretwork on top. Phases of moon and days month are both given. Simon Willard made his first at age 13. A shelf (right). Willard called these clocks, were as early 1784, timepieces, because they did not strike. The works were brass.

“Simon Willard, at his Clock Dial in Roxbury Street, manufactures every kind of clock work, such as large clocks for steeples, made in the best manner. . . . Clocks that will run one year without winding up, with very elegant cases, price 100 dollars. . . . Elegant daytime pieces, price 30 dollars. Timepieces which run 30 hours and warranted, price 10 dollars. . . . Chime clocks that will play six tunes, price 120 dollars. . . . Gentlemen who wish to purchase any kind of clocks are invited to call at said Willard’s Clock Manufacture, where they will receive satisfactory evidence that it is much cheaper to purchase new than old and second-hand clocks. He warrants all his work–and as he is ambitious to give satisfaction–he doubts not of receiving public approbation and patronage.”

Willard Originated the “Banjo” Clock

Although Simon Willard knew the worth of his clocks, it is doubtful if he dreamed of the approbation and patronage they would receive less than a hundred years after his death. He set out to make serviceable clocks that thrifty Americans could buy with a clear conscience. What would he say if he could happen in today on some sale of rare antique clocks and see his paragons of thrift and mechanical perfection sold for prices for four figures? And the purchasers, descendants, perhaps, of those thrifty New England customers of his, glad to get them at that price and paying for them with a smile?

Aaron Willard turned out his clocks by the hundred. The clock at right is mahogany with inlay. The other clock is by Nathaniel Edwards of Acton, Mass.

In 1802 Willard brought out his patent timepiece, which was later called the banjo clock. It was a prodigious success. No improvement has since been made on the original design. The story goes that such accuracy did Willard have in his hand and eye that he habitually filed the teeth of his cogwheels without marking them; and that when someone asked him why he didn’t stamp his brass with markers, he replied that it was unnecessary–his wheels were accurate. And Simon Willard was right! One proud owner of a Willard order clock says that it has run within 30 seconds of accuracy for a month.

Simon Willard died during the turbulent year of 1848. He had retired from business in 1839 and sold his tools and the good will of the business (together with the privilege of putting the name Simon Willard on the dials) to Elnathan Taber, his best apprentice. Simon Willard Jr. took these clocks and sold them at his shop in Boston.

It was this son, Simon Jr., who made the astronomical clock now in the observatory of Harvard University. His astronomical regulator was standard time for all railroads in New England.

Since the first grandfather clock appeared in England in 1681, clockmakers in this country and abroad have given them thought and consideration, so that now, when the antique hunter goes clock hunting, there is every style, every wood and every price at his disposal for this useful and beautiful ornament.

Grandfather Clock Repair in California

07.09.13

At 1-800-4CLOCKS, we get requests not only from all over the USA, but also from around the world, regarding where individuals and organizations should go to get their timepiece repaired.  Grandfather Clocks are the most frequently requested category, whether a Howard Miller Grandfather Clock that is no longer under warranty, or a 120 year old antique grandfather clock.  In fact, we get requests for all kinds of mechanical clocks and pocket watches too, including wall clocks, mantel clocks, cuckoo clocks, novelty clocks and grandmother clocks.  This is true for antique wall clocks and antique mantel clocks, including Kieninger Clocks and Hermle Clocks and Ridgeway Clocks.

We no longer encourage people to mail in their timepieces to us for repair.  We used to do that, and found it is much more efficient from everyone’s perspective to get their new or antique clock fixed reasonably locally to them.  To aid in that goal, we are sharing clock shops that do repairs, some with a particular specialty, in various geographical areas.  While we cannot recommend specific shops or warrant any work they might do, we do try here to give you a least of clock repair shops in California that may well be either able to help you themselves, or if not to point you in the right or a good direction.

We hope this list of clock repair shops in California helps.  We will be sharing other clock resources which may be of assistance on a continuing basis.

B & B Antique Clock Repair,  Arroyo Grande, CA 93420, tel. (805) 489-0415

Clock Master, 2734 E. Chapman Ave., Orange, CA 92869, tel. (714) 997-4029

Clocks Americana, 860 North Main, Orange, CA 92868, tel. (714) 997-0923

Clocks Etc., 971 Moraga Road, Lafayette, CA 94549, tel. (925) 284-4720

Davidson Clock Company, 10900 Los Alamitos Blvd, Suite 210, Los Alamitos, CA 90720, tel. (888) 419-6522

HRS Clocks, 490 1st St, Ste C, Solvang, CA 93463, tel. (805) 688-8555

Mike’s Clock Clinic, 17000 Western Avenue # 7, Gardena, CA 90247, tel. (877) 286-6762

Read-Co, 35791 Royal Sage Ct, Palm Desert, CA 92211, tel. (760) 565-1910

Redwood City Clock & Watch, 2738 Broadway, Redwood City, CA, 94062, tel. (650) 556-1197

Slaters Antiques & Collectibles, 609 N. 10th Street, Sacramento, CA 95811, tel. (916) 442-6183

The Clock Man Online, 205 W Commonwealth Ave, Fullerton, CA, 92832, tel. (714) 578-0089

The Tic Toc Shop, 9534 Reseda Blvd (this is the local Post Office address), Northridge, CA 91325, tel. (818) 718-8300

Tom’s Clock Service, 3909 Pacheco Blvd, Martinez, CA 94553, tel. (510) 228-8436

 

 

 

Clock Collecting Across Generations

06.10.13

I’m also pleasantly surprised that my daughter and son have shown some interest in clocks as well.  Initially they had not shown much interest in the grandfather clock idea, but I’m hoping that all these new clocks will help spark an interest, or at least all the exposure to my interest in clocks over the years will make them both a little sentimental about clocks as well.  Almost everyone who comes to my house comments on the fact that there is a clock anywhere you look, although now I’m trying to replace quantity with quality.

I have an old regulator wall clock with the original glass panel advertising Calumet baking powder that used to hang in a store that my grandparents owned.  This was one of two matching clocks, and I found this one in their barn with the wall clock movement missing.  I refinished the case and fit a key-wound pendulum movement from Klockit in it.  I guess that’s the only one that has some meaning or history to it.  I’ve had it hanging in my bedroom for the past 15 years which is nice except when I sleep somewhere else — on vacation, for example — and then it’s too quiet without the tick-tock sound I’m used to hearing.

I’ve also just discovered the novelty clock section of your website and the interesting Rhythm Clocks, so I’ll be looking at those much more closely.  Originally I was single-mindedly focused on grandfather clocks, and then wall clocks, that I haven’t even looked at everything else you offer.

You already definitely have me as a loyal customer.  I can’t promise I’m going to buy a grandfather clock every year, but I did a fair amount of research before I first contacted you, and was already impressed with your selection and prices; now you can add customer service to that as well.  And that’s pretty much the holy triumvirate of the retail business.

My parents own a hardware store, and my grandparents owned a dry goods store and a department store simultaneously, so I appreciate what it takes to deliver good customer service, and I prefer to give my business to a family-owned business that is well run.

Special thanks to a great grandfather clock and wall clock customer who actually wrote the above in an email to us.  The inter-generational aspect of the story, among others, made us believe this would be of interest to some of of grandfather clocks blog readers.

Regulator Wall Clock Calumet for Calumet Baking Powder

Links We Love: What we’re reading this week

06.07.13

AD’s favorite stories from around the web

Clocks Index

06.04.13

Consumers of all industrial and personal use items have heard of and to some degree follow the Consumer Confidence Index.  People on Wall Street and Economists all look at the Index of Leading Economic Indicators.  Manufacturers and economists alike look at the Consumer Price Index, or CPI, as among other things as a  bellwether for signs of potential inflation on the horizon.  Well here and now we would like to introduce the Clock Index.

Clocks by their nature are organizational creatures, whether they are the heartbeat of the home as a grandfather clock that all can hear and tell the time of day.  Wall clocks throughout the nation, and the World, tell people in homes what time of the day it is, and in offices can be even more integral to the workings of an organization with everything from the start of day, to meetings, to lunchtime, to coffee breaks, to quitting time can all be measured and watched by looking at a wall clock near you.  We have had many customers purchase atomic wall clocks for precisely the reason that they do not want employees discussing or arguing about whether it really is 5 o’clock or whatever the quitting time is, or not.  They see atomic clocks as productivity enhancers.

So should our Clock Index be more than the types of clocks we offer, such as grandfather clocks, mantle clocks, wall clocks, atomic clocks and much more, and should they are highlight the makers, such as Howard Miller Grandfather Clocks, Hermle Floor Clocks, the Ridgeway Grandfather Clock Collection, Kieninger Wall Clocks, Hermle Grandfather and Mantel Clocks, Americana Grandfather Clocks, or should the Clock Index take a completely different wither micro or macro view of the work of clocks.  Should it perhaps include the history if clocks, including the history of grandfather clocks, grandmother clocks, wall clocks and more, or should it highlight the current clock makers like Howard Miller Clocks, Kieninger Clocks, Hermle Clocks, Ridgeway Clocks and more, or should it include some well-known but no longer extant manufacturers of clocks such as Sligh Grandfather Clocks, Bulova Grandfather Clocks, Seth Thomas Clocks including the famous Seth Thomas Grandfather Clocks, Seth Thomas Wall Clocks and Seth Thomas Mantel and Nautical Clocks, among many others.

If one goes father back in clock history, simply 25 years and earlier, there an be thousand of clock makers and tens of thousand of clock and watchmakers around the globe going all the way back to the late 1600s to the present.  The horological history is rich and well documented in many places, and the Clock Index could be the focal point for bringing much of it together.

There are also membership associations such as the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors (NAWCC) and the American Watch and Clock Institute (AWCI) which are by themselves repositories of vast amounts not only of timepiece expertise and teaching, but also of clock and watch history from the golden days to the present.

Any thoughts individuals may have about the clock history, the current clock and timepiece market more broadly, and how a clock index might fit into all of that and be of most use to grandfather clock, wall clock and mantle clock shoppers, as well as to those studying clock history, would be most welcome to give us their time and thoughtful input.

Grandfather Clock Index

 

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